What I’ve Learned from Blogging

ID-1006819

I’m new to blogging, but I’ve already learned one important lesson – chocolate is sexy! What I mean is that when I post about a scrumptious chocolate dessert, I get hits through the roof. But, most of the other stuff I write about just doesn’t get the love.

This has been kind of tough for me because a part of me wants to write sexy chocolate posts everyday just to get the attention. But I didn’t start this blog to write about chocolate. I mean I want to write a little about it, because I enjoy it and it’s a part of my life. But if I write about chocolate too much I won’t be true to the essence of my blog.

What I really started this blog to do was to share about my plant-based diet because it’s transformed my weight and health and it’s made such a difference in my life. And I want to share that with people. I want others to know what going plant-strong can do for them.

I also want to share about my ongoing transition to veganism, a lifestyle that avoids harming or exploiting animals. When I first started eating plant-based, I didn’t think of myself as vegan. But over time not eating animals increased my compassion for them and now I don’t want to do anything to harm them.

I know my plant-based diet and veganism aren’t sexy; otherwise there would be more vegans in the world. But this is who I am and it’s what I want to share. So goodbye popularity, I cannot in good conscience write about chocolate everyday.

Oh well – I was never one of the ‘popular’ kids anyway.

Image courtesy of Graeme Weatherstone / http://www.freedigitalphotos.net

Advertisements

About celestedimilla

Hey there. I’m Celeste, California girl, writer, psychotherapist and burgeoning plant-based foodie.
Aside | This entry was posted in Daily Life and tagged , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

5 Responses to What I’ve Learned from Blogging

  1. I know what you mean about increased compassion for animals once stopping eating them!

  2. Anna says:

    “Heart-Health Benefits of Chocolate Unveiled

    Heart Healthy Food

    Healthy Diet and Lifestyle
    Grocery Guide – Heart-Healthy Kitchen Essentials
    Phytosterols: Sterols & Stanols
    Antioxidant Food Table
    35 Power Foods
    The Whole Truth and Nutting But the Truth
    The Power of Fish
    Heart-Health Benefits of Chocolate Unveiled

    Is Chocolate Good for Your Heart?

    Why a little, in moderation, may be beneficial

    Chocolate has gotten a lot of media coverage in recent years because it’s believed that it may help protect your cardiovascular system. The reasoning being that the cocoa bean is rich in a class of plant nutrients called flavonoids.

    Flavonoids help protect plants from environmental toxins and help repair damage. They can be found in a variety of foods, such as fruits and vegetables. When we eat foods rich in flavonoids, it appears that we also benefit from this “antioxidant” power.

    Antioxidants are believed to help the body’s cells resist damage caused by free radicals that are formed by normal bodily processes, such as breathing, and from environmental contaminants, like cigarette smoke. If your body does not have enough antioxidants to combat the amount of oxidation that occurs, it can become damaged by free radicals. For example, an increase in oxidation can cause low-density lipoprotein (LDL), also known as “bad” cholesterol, to form plaque on the artery walls.

    Flavanols are the main type of flavonoid found in cocoa and chocolate. In addition to having antioxidant qualities, research shows that flavanols have other potential influences on vascular health, such as lowering blood pressure, improving blood flow to the brain and heart, and making blood platelets less sticky and able to clot.

    Taken from Cleveland Clinic site

    These plant chemicals aren’t only found in chocolate. In fact, a wide variety of foods and beverages are rich in flavonols. These include cranberries, apples, peanuts, onions, tea and red wine.

    Are all types of chocolate healthy?

    Before you grab a chocolate candy bar or slice of chocolate cake, it’s important to understand that not all forms of chocolate contain high levels of flavanols.

    Cocoa naturally has a very strong, pungent taste, which comes from the flavanols. When cocoa is processed into your favorite chocolate products, it goes through several steps to reduce this taste. The more chocolate is processed (through things like fermentation, alkalizing, roasting, etc.), the more flavanols are lost. ‘

    Looks like not all choc is good for you, but it is not so bad…
    You will be always popular for me!!!

    • Hi Anna! Thanks for sharing this info. I absolutely believe that a little dark chocolate is healthy for you. I hope this post didn’t make it look like I didn’t think that! Still, the way most of us eat chocolate (in a sugar-laden chocolate cake, for example) is not healthy at all. Thanks so much for stopping by and for sharing – I’m always happy to hear from you! Celeste:)

  3. Anna says:

    Heart-Health Benefits of Chocolate Unveiled

    Heart Healthy Food

    Healthy Diet and Lifestyle
    Grocery Guide – Heart-Healthy Kitchen Essentials
    Phytosterols: Sterols & Stanols
    Antioxidant Food Table
    35 Power Foods
    The Whole Truth and Nutting But the Truth
    The Power of Fish
    Heart-Health Benefits of Chocolate Unveiled

    Is Chocolate Good for Your Heart?

    Why a little, in moderation, may be beneficial

    Chocolate has gotten a lot of media coverage in recent years because it’s believed that it may help protect your cardiovascular system. The reasoning being that the cocoa bean is rich in a class of plant nutrients called flavonoids.

    Flavonoids help protect plants from environmental toxins and help repair damage. They can be found in a variety of foods, such as fruits and vegetables. When we eat foods rich in flavonoids, it appears that we also benefit from this “antioxidant” power.

    Antioxidants are believed to help the body’s cells resist damage caused by free radicals that are formed by normal bodily processes, such as breathing, and from environmental contaminants, like cigarette smoke. If your body does not have enough antioxidants to combat the amount of oxidation that occurs, it can become damaged by free radicals. For example, an increase in oxidation can cause low-density lipoprotein (LDL), also known as “bad” cholesterol, to form plaque on the artery walls.

    Flavanols are the main type of flavonoid found in cocoa and chocolate. In addition to having antioxidant qualities, research shows that flavanols have other potential influences on vascular health, such as lowering blood pressure, improving blood flow to the brain and heart, and making blood platelets less sticky and able to clot.

    These plant chemicals aren’t only found in chocolate. In fact, a wide variety of foods and beverages are rich in flavonols. These include cranberries, apples, peanuts, onions, tea and red wine.

    Are all types of chocolate healthy?

    Before you grab a chocolate candy bar or slice of chocolate cake, it’s important to understand that not all forms of chocolate contain high levels of flavanols.

    Cocoa naturally has a very strong, pungent taste, which comes from the flavanols. When cocoa is processed into your favorite chocolate products, it goes through several steps to reduce this taste. The more chocolate is processed (through things like fermentation, alkalizing, roasting, etc.), the more flavanols are lost.
    Taken from Cleveland Clinic site…

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s